Jan S Redfern.

Behavioral Health 2014; 1(1): 1-2.

Available at: http://www.jghcs.info/index.php/bh/article/view/318/283

 
Behavioral Health
 

Jan S Redfern.
J Law Enforcement 2014; 4(1):1-24.

Several surveys have characterized the experiences of transgender individuals with the police and show a general lack of trust of law enforcement by the transgender community. To the best of the author’s knowledge, however, no published study has addressed the perspectives of United States law enforcement personnel. This nationwide survey assessed awareness, attitudes, and experiences of law enforcement personnel with respect to transgender individuals. The survey showed a high degree of awareness (95%) of the term transgender but also revealed a noticeable polarization of attitudes, ranging from generally accepting and empathetic to less tolerant and less accommodating. A majority of respondents (71%) reported that they had never attended sensitivity training to help them better understand and assist transgender people in the law enforcement setting. Of those who reported receiving training, 16 of 18 said it was somewhat helpful or very helpful. Notably, only 27% of respondents believed their department had written policies or procedures with respect to interacting with and processing transgender individuals. The survey clearly reveals a need for more police departments to consider sensitivity training of their law enforcement professionals to increase understanding and openness to gender fluidity and non-traditional gender presentation and to review best practices in interacting with the transgender community.

Available at: http://jghcs.info/index.php/l/article/view/313/279

Journal of Law Enforcement
 

Redfern, JS.

J Law Enforcement 2014; 3(4): 1-17.

Many experts agree that being transgender is a reflection of normal variation of human development and not a mental illness. However, transgender individuals continue to experience a wide range of unique challenges in their everyday lives, in workplaces, healthcare settings, judicial system, housing, and on occasion, in their interactions with law enforcement. Some transgender individuals have a general lack of trust of police, perhaps arising from first-hand experiences or the experiences of friends and community members, or as a result of the media publicizing accounts of harassment and incidents of abuse. Police departments should consider sensitivity training of law enforcement professionals to increase awareness and appreciation of gender diversity, to avoid personal biases and assumptions, and to avoid costly litigation from civil rights violations. Such training would help police officers improve interactions and communications with transgender individuals when officers are assisting these individuals or in cases where an arrest must be made. Transgender individuals should also be aware that they too have responsibilities during interactions with police, and their behavior can positively or negatively impact the outcome of such encounters. To help improve relations and bolster trust between the transgender community and law enforcement, police officers should consider speaking at local or national transgender organizations and conferences.

Available at http://www.jghcs.info/index.php/l/issue/view/42

 

 

 

 

Redfern JS, Sinclair B.

Journal of Communication in Healthcare: Strategies, Media, and Engagement in Global Health
In Press, March 2014 DOI 10.1179/1753807614Y.0000000045

Transgender persons represent a generally ill-served or underserved population. This marginalized group continues to experience considerable difficulty in obtaining culturally competent health care despite recommendations by professional organizations and introduction of anti-discrimination legislation. This review examines communication and procedural barriers to transgender health care and suggests practical steps to help ameliorate disparities and unequal treatment. Enhancing patient satisfaction through culturally competent health care, quality assurance, and patient feedback is critical to creating open lines of communication between practitioner and patient and fostering a favorable context for transgender patient care.

Bakhache P, Rodrigo C, Davie S, Ahuja A, Sudovar B, Crudup T, Rose M.

Eur J Pediatr. 2012 Dec 28. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract:
The New Vaccinations of Infants in Practice online survey in seven countries evaluated vaccination-related attitudes and concerns of parents of infants and health care providers (HCPs) who provide pediatric medical care. The survey showed that HCPs and parents were open to adding new vaccines to the immunization schedule, even if it requires co-administration with current vaccines or introduction of new office visits. Parental disease awareness campaigns would be helpful to achieve widespread acceptance of changes to vaccination schedules. In addition, HCPs would ideally provide disease education to parents to accompany recommendations for a new vaccine.

Roth DB, Heier JS, Thompson D, Soo Y, Vitti R, Saroj N, Berliner AJ, Groeztbach G, Sowade O, Zeitz O.

Poster presentation at Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, May 7, 2012.

Rose M, Bakhache P, Rodrigo C, Davie S, Ahuja A, Sudovar B, Crudup T.

Poster presentation at 30th Annual Meeting of the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Thessaloniki, Greece, May 8-12, 2012.

Parental Awareness and Knowledge About Invasive Meningococcal Disease: Results of a Multinational Survey.

Rodrigo C, Bakhache P, Rose M, Davie S, Ahuja A, Sudovar B, Crudup T.

Poster presentation at 30th Annual Meeting of the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Thessaloniki, Greece, May 8-12, 2012.

Bakhache P, Rodrigo C, Davie S, Ahuja A, Sudovar B, Crudup T, Rose M.

Poster presentation at 30th Annual Meeting of the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases, Thessaloniki, Greece, May 8-12, 2012.

 

Alderman M, Aiyer KJ.  Uric acid: role in cardiovascular disease and effects of losartan. Curr Med Res Opin. 2004 Mar;20(3):369-79.

Article excerpt:

A substantial body of epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that serum uric acid is an important, independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease especially in patients with hypertension, heart failure, or diabetes.

Article link:

http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1185/030079904125002982