Redfern JS, Blair AJ, Lee E, Feldman M.  Gastroduodenal ulceration following active immunization with PGE2 in dogs.  Role of gastric acid secretion.  Prostaglandins. 1987;34:623-632.

Excerpt link:

In this study we present evidence to suggest that gastroduodenal mucosal defects may occur in gastric fistula dogs actively immunized with PGE2-thyroglobulin conjugate. One of four PGE2-immunized dogs developed a chronic pyloroduodenal ulcer with penetration into the pancreas and the other three had endoscopic evidence of gastric and/or duodenal erosions.

Redfern JS, Blair AJ, Lee E, Feldman M. Gastrointestinal ulcer formation in rabbits immunized with prostaglandin E2. Gastroenterology. 1987;93:744-752.

Excerpt link:
Circulating prostaglandin E2 antibodies were produced in 12 rabbits immunized with prostaglandin E2-thyroglobulin conjugate and ulcers occurred in 10, usually in the stomach and less often in the small intestine. Immunization of rabbits with both prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha significantly increased the number of gastric ulcers compared with rabbits immunized with prostaglandin E2 alone.

Goldschmiedt M, Redfern JS, Feldman M.  Food coloring and monosodium glutamate:  effects on the cephalic phase of gastric acid secretion and gastrin release in humans. Am J Clin Nutr. 1990;51:794- 797.

Excerpt link:

Although food additives may have a significant impact on the marketing and acceptability of food and may occasionally lead to side effects, the effect of these additives on the digestive process in humans is unknown. We evaluated whether adding coloring or monosodium glutamate to food increases the cephalic phase of gastric acid secretion or gastrin release.

Redfern JS, Lee E, Feldman M.  Effect of indomethacin on gastric mucosal prostaglandins in humans. Correlation with mucosal damage. Gastroenterology. 1987;92:969-977.

Excerpt link:

We evaluated in healthy human beings the effect of indomethacin on gastric mucosal prostaglandin concentration and on gastric mucosal damage in a placebo-controlled study. Prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha concentrations of gastric mucosal biopsy specimens, obtained endoscopically, were measured by radioimmunoassay.

Heylings JR, Redfern JS, Feldman M.  Inhibitory effect of isoproterenol on gastric acid secretion in the rat.  Role of endogenous histamine.  Alimentary Pharmacol Therap. 1988;2:419-428.

Excerpt link:

In dogs beta-adrenoreceptor agonists inhibit gastric acid secretion stimulated by exogenous gastrin to a much greater extent than acid secretion stimulated by exogenous histamine. One possible explanation for this observation is that endogenous histamine is important in gastrin-mediated acid secretion and that isoprenaline and related beta-adrenoreceptor agonists block gastric mucosal histamine release. This possibility was tested in the present study in gastric lumen-perfused anaesthetized rats.

Redfern JS.  Prostaglandin synthesis and catabolism in the gastric mucosa.  Studies in normal rabbits and rabbits immunized with PGE2. Prostaglandins. 1988;36:355-372.

Excerpt link:

Antral and fundic mucosal homogenates obtained from prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits converted 14C-arachidonic acid to prostaglandin E2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and prostaglandin D2.

Faust TW, Lee E, Redfern JS, Feldman M.  Effect of prostaglandin F3α on gastric mucosal injury by ethanol in rats:  comparison with prostaglandin F2α Prostaglandins. 1989;37:483-504.

Excerpt link:

In humans eicosapentaenoic acid can be converted to 3-series prostaglandins (PGF3 alpha, PGI3, and PGE3). Whether 3-series prostaglandins can protect the gastric mucosa from injury as effectively as their 2-series analogs is unknown. Therefore, we compared the protective effects of PGF3 alpha and PGF2 alpha against gross and microscopic gastric mucosal injury in rats.

Faust TW, Redfern JS, Lee E, Feldman M.  Effect of fish oil on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.  Am J Physiol. 1989;257:G9-G13.

Excerpt link:

Fundic mucosal content and synthesis of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, the major prostanoid in the rat gastric mucosa, were determined after rats had ingested a diet containing 10% fish oil or 10% corn oil for 4 wk.

Redfern JS, Lee E, Feldman M.  Effect of immunization with prostaglandin metabolites on gastrointestinal ulceration.  Am J Physiol.  1988;255:G723-G730.

Excerpt link:

Active immunization of rabbits with a 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha-thyroglobulin conjugate induced gastrointestinal ulceration, whereas active immunization of rabbits with 13,14-dihydro-15-keto prostaglandin E2-thyroglobulin conjugate or with thyroglobulin alone did not result in ulceration.

Redfern JS, Feldman M.  Role of endogenous prostaglandins in preventing gastrointestinal ulceration:  induction of ulcers by antibodies to prostaglandins.  Gastroenterology. 1989;96:596-605.

Excerpt link:

Active immunization of rabbits with the principal, endogenous prostaglandins in the gastrointestinal mucosa induces gastrointestinal mucosal ulceration. Development of ulceration in prostaglandin-immunized rabbits appears to be a direct consequence of production of specific prostaglandin antibodies, as prostaglandin antibodies per se induce gastric ulceration within 9 days when administered intravenously to unimmunized rabbits.